Mexico: Food and Traditions — By Ben on 04 November 2010
Day of the Dead in Coyoacan

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For the past couple of years I’ve written about one of my favorite Mexican holidays, día de muertos or day of the dead. This post has a little explanation of what this holiday is about and this other one contains the recipe for pan de muerto, a delicious bread that is eaten traditionally around this time of the year. I made it last year and it turned out so good, you should really try it!

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This time I’m not going to write a lot about this holiday. Instead I’m going to share with you some of the pictures I took on Tuesday in Coyoacan. I’ve written that Coyoacan is my favorite part of the city and I’m living in that area of the city now. Since November 2nd is an official holiday I didn’t have to work and I spent the whole afternoon walking around the center of the neighborhood taking pictures, watching people in costumes and street performers, eating great food, drinking great coffee and just enjoying myself. Next year I will definitely dress up for this holiday, starting on October 31st to celebrate Halloween, then Nov. 1st and 2nd for this fun time of the year.

Let’s start with the traditional altars that people put up for their dead family members:

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Every year different organizations and artist create artistic offerings that are on display in the main plaza:

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The Mexican or Aztec Marigold is the flower used to decorate altars and for some artwork like the ones shown above:

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There was also a lot of art to mock death:

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And of course La Catrina, an elegant skull that is a staple in Mexican culture and traditions:

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And many other costumes that people have been incorporating into this celebration:

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But the best part for me was the prayer that a group of original Mexican dancers performed as part of the celebration to the gods that gave origin to this amazing tradition (I might be joining this group):

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Around the country there are many ways people celebrate this day. Some of the most beautiful ones are in Patzcuaro, Michoaca, Oaxaca City, Oaxaca and in many places of Mexico City like Coyoacan, downtown, Xochimilco and the National University of Mexico . But every region of the country has its own traditions and its own way of celebrating. I’m already making plans for next year. If you ever come to Mexico around this time of the year, make sure to include this celebration in your itinerary.

¡Buen provecho!


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grew up around food. His family owned a restaurant in Mexico City and he spent a big deal of his childhood helping and learning after school the art of creating delicious dishes from simple ingredients. He created this blog to share his kitchen adventures with the world.

(13) Readers Comments

  1. So interesting! Thanks for sharing.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  2. Wow! I love your pics here Ben! So well captured…the mood, the feeling and the colours.

  3. that photo is so stunning Ben!

  4. I've never seen any celebration like this in the US but it looks like a ton of fun! Plus that bread sounds, well, amazing in every way!

  5. Wonderful post!
    Cheers

  6. Nice, this is first sight of what day of the dead really looks like, thanks.

  7. So colorful! Thanks for the tour

  8. Beautiful photos! I'd love to visit Mexico during the day of the dead holiday.

  9. Ben, What a beautiful tradition! I just love your pics :)

    Have a good weekend!

  10. Great shots Ben. It sounds like an amazing celebration to witness and I sure hope I can see it live one day!

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